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SHARE WHAT CAUGHT THEIR EYE

TINA CLEAVELIN, MJE, M. Ed.

San Marcos High School [CA] | Josh Clements, adviser

END IN MIND

Goals for a better publication are smart but require a plan. Once the San Marcos editors decided to improve their photography, adviser Josh Clements developed a weekly photo award system to make it happen.

Throughout the week, Clements views every photo taken to determine the Photos of the Week. He selects students who have shown proficiency and improvement. On Friday, Clements walks his staff through the winner’s photos and discusses why each photographer was chosen. The winners share technical and compositional strategies used.

 Each winner receives an enamel pin they put on his/her yearbook staff lanyard. At the beginning of the school year, Clements emails the faculty explaining the significance of the pins. When photographers are on assignments, the community recognizes the significance.

In addition to the pins, the principal chooses a couple ‘photos of the week’ winners to include in his weekly newsletter. The photos also appear on the campus TVs used for daily announcements and the broadcast staff includes the winners in the credits.

The shouts outs help build the yearbook brand and value of the publication that in turn lead to an increase of more than 300 books sold.

JEFF MOFFITT, MJE

Clayton High School [MO] | Marci Pieper, adviser

TWIST AND TURN

For volume 100 of the Clamo yearbook, the staff decided to break away from the expected. The theme, 100 Years of Clamo, could have been a traditional anniversary book highlighting the past. However, the opening copy on the first spread says it best: “Being the 100th volume, we were committed to telling the story of Clayton High School once more but with our own twist. We focused on the stories of our students, the ones who made history and the school that will be recognized for academic greatness, creative minds, and strong leaders for another 100 years.”

Every story, every photo in the book captures what it feels like to be part of Clayton High School. As an example, the Raging Rapids spread takes you front and center by capturing emotion and reaction through photography. Then, the writers break away from a traditional quote/transition format and provide background and insight with detailed captions, unique quotes and an unexpected quick read sidebar. All of these pieces work together here, and in all of the 100 aspects of Clayton shown in the yearbook, to achieve exactly what the editors wrote about in the opening copy.

LIZABETH WALSH, MJE

Paul VI Catholic High School [VA] | Meghan O’Connor, adviser

WHAT IS OLD IS NEW AGAIN

For volume 100 of the Clamo yearbook, the staff decided to break away from the expected. The theme, 100 Years of Clamo, could have been a traditional anniversary book highlighting the past. However, the opening copy on the first spread says it best: “Being the 100th volume, we were committed to telling the story of Clayton High School once more but with our own twist. We focused on the stories of our students, the ones who made history and the school that will be recognized for academic greatness, creative minds, and strong leaders for another 100 years.”

Every story, every photo in the book captures what it feels like to be part of Clayton High School. As an example, the Raging Rapids spread takes you front and center by capturing emotion and reaction through photography. Then, the writers break away from a traditional quote/transition format and provide background and insight with detailed captions, unique quotes and an unexpected quick read sidebar. All of these pieces work together here, and in all of the 100 aspects of Clayton shown in the yearbook, to achieve exactly what the editors wrote about in the opening copy.